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Thursday, February 25
 

08:15

08:15

08:15

08:15

08:15

08:15

09:00

U04: Testing Your Thinking - CLOSED
Testing Your Thinking - Counteracting Impostor Syndrome Have you ever felt like those around you perceive you as being more competent than you really are? Have you ever had a hard time accepting praise or attributed your accomplishments to luck or timing? If so, you may be suffering from Impostor Syndrome. At our jobs we constantly question everything around us and dig to get to the root of things, but when it comes to our own thoughts and feelings we often do not apply the same scrutiny. When we downplay our contributions, do our thoughts actually reflect reality or are we overlooking a lot of skill and hard work that went into those achievements? While we might experience dread or fear that one day we may be exposed as incompetent, are these feelings actually justified? Achieving an accurate view of our skills allows us to better understand where to improve them. By trusting in our abilities and eliminating the fear of being ‘found out’ we can pursue greater and scarier goals. And we can bring our new-found confidence and energy to help and influence both our teams and the testing community as a whole. Participants in this workshop will: - engage in exercises aimed to expose the discrepancy between reality and their perception of their own abilities - learn ways to identify ‘faulty’ thoughts and counteract Impostor Syndrome - learn how to apply Socratic questioning and heuristics to their thought processes, effectively testing their own thinking

Speakers
avatar for Gina Enache (RO)

Gina Enache (RO)

Founding Member, Choice
Madalina Sava and Gina Enache both hold Master’s Degrees in Psychology and are two of the founding members of Choice, an organization that sets up events and workshops, aiming to promote scientific psychology, improve people’s lives and help them achieve their goals.
avatar for Madalina Sava (RO)

Madalina Sava (RO)

Founding Member, Choice
Madalina Sava and Gina Enache both hold Master’s Degrees in Psychology and are two of the founding members of Choice, an organization that sets up events and workshops, aiming to promote scientific psychology, improve people’s lives and help them achieve their goals.
avatar for Ioana Serban (UK)

Ioana Serban (UK)

Agile Software Engineer in Test, eBay
Ioana Serban is a Software Engineer in Test working at eBay and is all about challenging assumptions of what a tester is or isn’t “‘supposed” to do. All of them are real-life friends and are brave and naive enough to think that they can make the world a better place, one person at a time.


Thursday February 25, 2016 09:00 - 12:30
Tutorial Room - D

09:00

U05: Bug Triage – Can we all agree? - CLOSED
In this workshop you are going to argue! Sounds terrible? Sure, but that is the reality when people have different needs and priorities. Leading the argument to clear and quick decision is difficult and needs training. The point of this workshop is to experience this pressure and learn from that. A big part of software testing is trying to understanding which issues to fix first and which not to fix at all. A bug triage meeting is a big part of test management, especially when the deadline is close and the product is on fire. In this interactive workshop, we’ll go through a couple of triage sessions and examine the skills and personal qualities essential for excellent results. You have an opportunity to observe, analyze and practice several test management skills. Every session is concluded with debrief where we discuss what happened and what can be done to make it easier for everybody. Key takeaways Bug Triage - what is the point, how to use it to make your life easier. Tips for handling difficult people at meetings. Putting your test management skills into practice and learning from it.

Speakers
avatar for Kristjan Uba (EE)

Kristjan Uba (EE)

Test Manager, Private
Once I was a developer, then after a joke in a meeting I became a tester. | | And I liked it so much I’ve done it since. And as I shared my ideas of testing with a passion I was promoted team lead and then Test Manager. | | I also run PEST in Estonia and try to do my bit at conferences and universities.


Thursday February 25, 2016 09:00 - 12:30
Tutorial Room - E

09:00

U06: Agile Testing Strategy - Responding to Change - CLOSED
How is agile impacting our testing strategies? How do you combine checking and testing in such a fast paced environment? How do you handle continuous change and the ever increasing use of tools? In this workshop Richard and Huib will challenge the hype around agile testing. We will explore the need to balance human exploration with automation in this context. How you can get the two working harmoniously and reap the benefits. Attendees will leave this workshop armed with many visual strategies for tackling testing in an agile context. With new perspectives on the importance of skilled human exploration when it comes to creating automation truly capable of supporting testing.

Speakers
avatar for Huib Schoots (NL)

Huib Schoots (NL)

Senior Consultant, Improve Quality Services
Is a tester, consultant and people lover. He shares his passion for testing through consulting, coaching, training, and giving presentations on a variety of test subjects. With almost twenty years of experience in IT and software testing, Huib is experienced in different testing roles. Curious and passionate, he is an agile and context-driven tester who attempts to read everything ever published on software testing. Huib is one of four... Read More →
avatar for Richard Bradshaw (UK)

Richard Bradshaw (UK)

Tester, Friendly Testing Limited
Richard Bradshaw | | I am a friendly tester with a passion for testing. I try to share my passion with the wider community via blogging, forums, twitter and participating at conferences. Richard is a founding member of MEWT (Midlands Exploratory Workshop on Testing). Testing has been my only career since graduating and have been testing for 8 years now. I have strong technical skills and encourage the use of tools and automation in the right... Read More →


Thursday February 25, 2016 09:00 - 12:30
Tutorial Room - F

09:00

U01: Testing Fundamentals for Experienced Testers - CLOSED

Testing fundamentals can help experienced testers expose more bugs with less effort

Through years of experience you have mastered testing in your domain. But are important bugs still slipping by? Can you transfer your skills to new applications? Why can’t others get the job done? Test fundamentals can help.

Rob Sabourin breaks testing fundamentals into five areas, philosophy, scientific method, problem solving, math and rhetoric. Test philosophy improves purposeful testing revealing truths about what testing can and cannot do. Scientific method provides frameworks to advance knowledge confirming or refute conjectures while designing great test experiments. Many problem solving strategies exist based on modeling knowledge and the unknown. Math (discrete, logic, combinations and probability) improves test design and result interpretation. Rhetoric skills improve tester’s communication, argumentation and persuasion.

Applying testing fundamentals focuses testing, closes gaps, eliminates waste and helps you do the right things well. Rob teaches you “how to know about what to test” and “what to know about how to test”.


Speakers
avatar for Rob Sabourin (CA)

Rob Sabourin (CA)

Software Engineer, Teacher and Consultant, AmiBug
Rob Sabourin, P. Eng., has more than thirty-two years of management experience leading teams of software development professionals. A well-respected member of the software engineering community, Rob has managed, trained, mentored, and coached hundreds of top professionals in the field. He frequently speaks at conferences and writes on software engineering, SQA, testing, management, and internationalization. Rob wrote I am a Bug!, the popular... Read More →


Thursday February 25, 2016 09:00 - 17:00
Tutorial Room - A

09:00

U02: And…You're On! - a SpeakEasy Speaker's Clinic - CLOSED

This tutorial is for anyone who wants to grow their public speaking skills and confidence in a supportive, non-threatening environment, whether you are:

  • A novice who wants to feel more confident making presentations at work
  • A tester with great ideas, but no speaker experience, who wants to start speaking at conferences and local meet-ups
  • An experienced speaker who’d like to add to your presenters toolkit
  • A tester who has no speaker experience and wants help to formulate an idea

Each participant will have the opportunity to present a brief talk and receive feedback from other participants and the instructors. You’ll also get to learn by seeing other participants speak and sharing your feedback with them.


Speakers
avatar for Anne-Marie Charrett (AU)

Anne-Marie Charrett (AU)

Test Engineering Lead, Tyro Payments
Anne-Marie Charrett is a software tester, trainer and coach with a reputation of excellence and passion for the craft of software testing. An electronic engineer by trade, software testing chose her when she started testing protocols against European standards and has been hooked ever since. | | Though born and bred in Ireland, Anne-Marie now works as a Test Lead for Tyro Payments in Sydney Australia where she helps others deliver quality... Read More →
avatar for Fiona Charles (CA)

Fiona Charles (CA)

Software Test Consultant, Quality Intelligence Inc.
Fiona Charles is the co-founder (with Anne-Marie Charrett), of Speak Easy, a volunteer organization whose goal is to increase gender diversity and help new speakers find their voices at tech conferences. As a consultant, Fiona teaches organizations to manage their software testing risk, and IT practitioners project skills “beyond process”—hands-on practical skills essential to thrive and excel on any kind of software project. As... Read More →


Thursday February 25, 2016 09:00 - 17:00
Tutorial Room - B

09:00

U03: Questions are Powerful - Use them Effectively - CLOSED
Questions are a powerful tool, and good questioning skills are extremely important. Through effective use, we can *Get an idea or our context. *Save ourselves time and effort. *Encourage participation and teamwork. *Create outside-the-box thinking. *Engage in more effective learning. *Start decision making conversations. *Improve our inquiry skills. During this practical interactive session we will explore the power of questions and their ability to make us and others think by looking at items such as: *Listening to set the questions. *Use of probing questions. *Open and closed questions. *Constructive conversations *Tone. *Rephrasing. We will do this with discussion, exercises and evaluation as we go. Questions can help create and negate, learn and teach, and stop and start projects, connections and relationships. Participants will walk away with ideas on how to sharpen their questioning skills to a fine tool which can be used to transform their every conversation and to increase their thinking. I use open questions daily to gather more information, open questions give people no other choice but to churn things over in their head before they respond. I also use open questions when I collaborate as it helps defocus for a minute while they think about their answer and helps them realise what is going wrong as their sub-conscious churns away. I have tone questions used on me, tone can have a huge impact, a one word question and change of tone can change anything. Would you like to sharpen your questions? Then come along.

Speakers
avatar for Tony Bruce (UK)

Tony Bruce (UK)

Tester, Tony Bruce Consulting Ltd
Tony Bruce is a professional, experienced, constantly learning, coaching and teaching agile team member who specialises in Testing. He has worked in various industries with organisations such as Channel 4, Ernst & Young, LMAX and The Children’s Society. He is an active member of the Testing community, he hosts the London #TesterGathering and speaks at conferences all over the world.  He keeps a blog at... Read More →


Thursday February 25, 2016 09:00 - 17:00
Tutorial Room - C

10:30

10:30

10:30

10:30

10:30

10:30

12:30

L01: Lunch at Tivoli Brasserie - CLOSED
Mingle and Lunch at "The Brasserie"

Thursday February 25, 2016 12:30 - 13:30
Tutorial Room - C

12:30

L01: Lunch at Tivoli Brasserie - CLOSED
Mingle and Lunch at "The Brasserie"

Thursday February 25, 2016 12:30 - 13:30
Tutorial Room - F

12:30

L01: Lunch at Tivoli Brasserie - CLOSED
Mingle and Lunch at "The Brasserie"

Thursday February 25, 2016 12:30 - 13:30
Tutorial Room - E

12:30

L01: Lunch at Tivoli Brasserie - CLOSED
Mingle and Lunch at "The Brasserie"

Thursday February 25, 2016 12:30 - 13:30
Tutorial Room - A

12:30

L01: Lunch at Tivoli Brasserie - CLOSED

Mingle and Lunch at "The Brasserie"


Thursday February 25, 2016 12:30 - 13:30
Tutorial Room - B

12:30

L01: Lunch at Tivoli Brasserie - CLOSED

Mingle and Lunch at "The Brasserie"


Thursday February 25, 2016 12:30 - 13:30
Tutorial Room - D

13:30

U07: Embedded Agile Testing - A Practical Example - CLOSED
Learn how testers and developers can collaborate to improve the quality of the software In this workshop we want to show how we have been working at eBay with embedded testers and how this has improved the quality of our software and the productivity of the team. Embrace the opportunity to take part in an agile development team: code together, test together, devise solutions together ‘­ by the end you’ll realize we aren’t so different. You will work in groups of around 2-3 people. This will be your agile team. Some coding knowledge would be great, but will not be necessary for the exercises. Takeaways: See how other testers are working through practical examples and experience sharing. How can we find bugs earlier than in the traditional/evil testing phase? How can we collaborate in order to bridge the gap between developers and testers? Understand how developers test and what testing they focus on. Realise that our goals as developers and testers are similar: in the end we aren’t all that different. Please bring a laptop with the Google Chrome browser installed.

Speakers
avatar for Jan Eumann (DE)

Jan Eumann (DE)

Software Engineer in Test, eBay
Jan is a Senior Software Engineer in Test working at eBay. He has been in the software industry for more than 10 years working in different roles in the software development process. | | Jan started as a developer and quickly learned to appreciate skilled testers. During the last years he worked as a test engineer looking into exploratory testing and how automation can support testing. At the moment he is working in an agile team performing... Read More →
avatar for Phil Quinn (DE)

Phil Quinn (DE)

Java Server Side Developer, GameGenetics
Phil Quinn is a Agile Software Engineer at Game Genetics. He started out working mainly on legacy systems where testing was low priority and delivery was everything. Regression was common place and support was a constant burden. | | In the last years however, after discovering the wonders of Agile and lean, he has been convinced that it doesn’t have to be this way. Using TDD and BDD techniques with Agile development practices, we can... Read More →


Thursday February 25, 2016 13:30 - 17:00
Tutorial Room - D

13:30

U08: Become Someone who Makes Things Happen - CLOSED
Katrina’s entry into the international testing community has been compared to an asteroid; unexpected and explosive. However she first experienced years of frustration attempting to implement change in established processes without the knowledge or support of a professional network. How did she turn exasperation into action to become a leader of change rather than a sole agent? Katrina will explain how she became confident in communicating change to stakeholders, transforming her subversive resistance into agreed transformation that management understood and advocated for. This started with creating recognition of the need for change, and Katrina shares an example of how to facilitate this discovery within a development team. Katrina will demonstrate how to communicate change to stakeholders by explaining a technique to describe change in business language. She will show examples of how to share this message through written and visual media, and describe a self-assessment tool that helps other people to learn how to speak convincingly about change. As part of her current role, Katrina leads a team of change agents. She will conclude this session by revealing some of the tools of influence she uses to lead, sharing the ways that she generates and maintains enthusiasm for a testing revolution. Key takeaways • Entry points to your local test community. • How to facilitate the discovery of a need for change in people around you. • The SPIN technique to identify and communicate the business value of change. • Examples of marketing change to business people using visual information. • A self-assessment tool for conversations about change. • How to identify and share the methods that create other change leaders.

Speakers
avatar for Katrina Clokie (NZ)

Katrina Clokie (NZ)

Testing Coach, Bank of New Zealand
Katrina Clokie serves a team of more than 20 testers as a Testing Coach in Wellington, New Zealand. She is an active contributor to the international testing community as the editor of Testing Trapeze magazine, a mentor with Speak Easy, a co-founder of her local testing MeetUp WeTest Workshops, an international conference speaker, frequent blogger and tweeter.


Thursday February 25, 2016 13:30 - 17:00
Tutorial Room - E

13:30

U09: How Change Affects Us - CLOSED
One of the core ideas of working in an agile fashion is to be able to cope with changes. Usually we refer to program changes, new user stories or changing functionality that we have already built. But changes also happens to the team, the organisation, the customers and all those 'other' things. And dealing with these changes is difficult as seen from a human being perspective. Even those who boldly claims to embrace change usually only means it when they are not themselves impacted by it. In this workshop we will dig down into how we work as humans using the Satir Change Model. We will work with learning how the model works and what we can do at each stage of it. Of course we will relate all this to changes that happens in agile projects. The Satir Change Model is a ready-to-use tool for analysing and grasping a difficult situation. Knowing how it works and applying it will help you gain some understanding of what is actually going on.

Speakers
avatar for Carsten Feilberg (DK)

Carsten Feilberg (DK)

Consultant, House of Test
Carsten Feilberg has been in IT for more than 20 years, 14 of which has focused on test and test management. His experience ranges from small projects to large-scale programs. People and human interaction plays a vital role in his work, being a PSL graduate and studying behavioral economics in his spare time. He tweets and is a well-known blogger and presenter at conferences, strongly advocating common-sense in programming and testing and... Read More →


Thursday February 25, 2016 13:30 - 17:00
Tutorial Room - F

15:00

15:00

15:00

15:00

15:00

15:00

 
Friday, February 26
 

08:15

08:15

08:45

C01: Opening - CLOSED
CopenhagenContext 2016 Chair Ilari Henrik Aegerter, welcomes you to the 3rd CopenhagenContext Conference and introduces to the overall program:
  • 2 KeyNotes
  • 9 Tutorials (3 full day and 6 half day)
  • 12 Track Sessions

By world leading challenging, engaging and entertaining speakers from:
  • Australia (AU)
  • Canada (CA)
  • Denmark (DK)
  • Estonia (EE)
  • Finland (FI)
  • Germany (DE)
  • The Netherlands (NL)
  • New Zealand (NZ)
  • Romania (RO)
  • Serbia (RS)
  • Sweden (SE)
  • United Kingdom (UK)

With professional Program Committee test practitioners:
  • Cecilie Motzfeldt (DK)
  • Ben Kelly (UK)
  • Ioana Serban (UK)
  • Ilari Henrik Aegerter (CH)

Partnered with:
  • DELTA Share
  • Tecpoint
  • Dansk IT (DIT)

Program Committee
avatar for Chair - Ilari Henrik Aegerter (CH)

Chair - Ilari Henrik Aegerter (CH)

Managing Director, House of Test GmbH
My formal studies have brought me from General Linguistics and Sociology to Software Engineering and Software Testing. I so much liked the profession that I continued to intensively work on my skills. Being a context-driven tester is the natural outcome and I believe that software testing is not a clerical job but a profession, which needs a high level of proficiency. | | I have 10+ years of experience in the field, coming from the medical... Read More →

Friday February 26, 2016 08:45 - 09:00
18: Columbine

08:45

C01: Opening - CLOSED
CopenhagenContext 2016 Chair Ilari Henrik Aegerter, welcomes you to the 3rd CopenhagenContext Conference and introduces to the overall program:
  • 2 KeyNotes
  • 9 Tutorials (3 full day and 6 half day)
  • 12 Track Sessions

By world leading challenging, engaging and entertaining speakers from:
  • Australia (AU)
  • Canada (CA)
  • Denmark (DK)
  • Estonia (EE)
  • Finland (FI)
  • Germany (DE)
  • The Netherlands (NL)
  • New Zealand (NZ)
  • Romania (RO)
  • Serbia (RS)
  • Sweden (SE)
  • United Kingdom (UK)

With professional Program Committee test practitioners:
  • Cecilie Motzfeldt (DK)
  • Ben Kelly (UK)
  • Ioana Serban (UK)
  • Ilari Henrik Aegerter (CH)

Partnered with:
  • DELTA Share
  • Tecpoint
  • Dansk IT (DIT)

Program Committee
avatar for Chair - Ilari Henrik Aegerter (CH)

Chair - Ilari Henrik Aegerter (CH)

Managing Director, House of Test GmbH
My formal studies have brought me from General Linguistics and Sociology to Software Engineering and Software Testing. I so much liked the profession that I continued to intensively work on my skills. Being a context-driven tester is the natural outcome and I believe that software testing is not a clerical job but a profession, which needs a high level of proficiency. | | I have 10+ years of experience in the field, coming from the medical... Read More →

Friday February 26, 2016 08:45 - 09:00
19: Harlekin

09:00

K01: A Tale of Two Contexts - CLOSED

Colleagues, friends and testers, Anne-Marie Charrett and Fiona Charles live half a planet apart. In their work lives, they are even farther apart, testing and managing testing in vastly different contexts.

Anne-Marie operates in a world of continuous delivery, micro-services, pair programming in the high risk financial sector. Quality is paramount but so is the ability to rapidly deploy. It’s high octane fuel, and the testing has to reflect that.

Fiona’s world is big projects with long test cycles, often in organizations that have barely heard of Agile, let alone begun to practice it.

The issues they grapple with and the strategies they devise are as different as their contexts.

Or are they?

Join Fiona and Anne-Marie as they explore the diversity—and surprising commonalities—of two contexts


Moderators
avatar for Anne-Marie Charrett (AU)

Anne-Marie Charrett (AU)

Test Engineering Lead, Tyro Payments
Anne-Marie Charrett is a software tester, trainer and coach with a reputation of excellence and passion for the craft of software testing. An electronic engineer by trade, software testing chose her when she started testing protocols against European standards and has been hooked ever since. | | Though born and bred in Ireland, Anne-Marie now works as a Test Lead for Tyro Payments in Sydney Australia where she helps others deliver quality... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Fiona Charles (CA)

Fiona Charles (CA)

Software Test Consultant, Quality Intelligence Inc.
Fiona Charles is the co-founder (with Anne-Marie Charrett), of Speak Easy, a volunteer organization whose goal is to increase gender diversity and help new speakers find their voices at tech conferences. As a consultant, Fiona teaches organizations to manage their software testing risk, and IT practitioners project skills “beyond process”—hands-on practical skills essential to thrive and excel on any kind of software project. As... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
19: Harlekin

09:00

K01: A Tale of Two Contexts - CLOSED

Colleagues, friends and testers, Anne-Marie Charrett and Fiona Charles live half a planet apart. In their work lives, they are even farther apart, testing and managing testing in vastly different contexts.

Anne-Marie operates in a world of continuous delivery, micro-services, pair programming in the high risk financial sector. Quality is paramount but so is the ability to rapidly deploy. It’s high octane fuel, and the testing has to reflect that.

Fiona’s world is big projects with long test cycles, often in organizations that have barely heard of Agile, let alone begun to practice it.

The issues they grapple with and the strategies they devise are as different as their contexts.

Or are they?

Join Fiona and Anne-Marie as they explore the diversity—and surprising commonalities—of two contexts


Speakers
avatar for Anne-Marie Charrett (AU)

Anne-Marie Charrett (AU)

Test Engineering Lead, Tyro Payments
Anne-Marie Charrett is a software tester, trainer and coach with a reputation of excellence and passion for the craft of software testing. An electronic engineer by trade, software testing chose her when she started testing protocols against European standards and has been hooked ever since. | | Though born and bred in Ireland, Anne-Marie now works as a Test Lead for Tyro Payments in Sydney Australia where she helps others deliver quality... Read More →
avatar for Fiona Charles (CA)

Fiona Charles (CA)

Software Test Consultant, Quality Intelligence Inc.
Fiona Charles is the co-founder (with Anne-Marie Charrett), of Speak Easy, a volunteer organization whose goal is to increase gender diversity and help new speakers find their voices at tech conferences. As a consultant, Fiona teaches organizations to manage their software testing risk, and IT practitioners project skills “beyond process”—hands-on practical skills essential to thrive and excel on any kind of software project. As... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
18: Columbine

10:00

10:00

10:30

R01: A Meditation on Power and Change - CLOSED
Navigating power relations and introducing change in organizations can be really difficult. It’s because power relations can be hard to detect, and because “people hate change”. But power and change are related to each other. So sometimes we say we feel “powerful” if we’ve managed to change something, and, occasionally, we say we are “powerless” when we’ve failed to achieve our goals. What do we really mean? Making an effort to understand what power is like and how it operates can be essential for someone interested in how systems work, and who wants to be great at driving change. Thinking deeply about power, looking at how it’s manifested and building on Foucault’s ideas about power has helped me build a toolbox. The ideas in the toolbox help me understand, ask questions about, analyze and address the complexity of power and make it tangible instead of abstract. It seems to me that having thought about the inner workings of power has made me more powerful and insightful. On top of that, I’ve learned lessons about trying to make changes in how testing is perceived or change how it’s done. I’ve learned about change patterns that help me develop tactics for implementing change. But after all, I’ve found that understanding power is a strong foundation to leading change in the organizations. In this talk I want to: • invite you to reflect on power and change: let’s make “power” tangible and personal, and analyze the context around change you want to drive • help you ask useful questions when analyzing power relations in your organization so they wouldn’t trip you up • share change patterns that have worked for me and explain why they have worked through concepts of power

Speakers
avatar for Helena Jeret-Mäe (EE)

Helena Jeret-Mäe (EE)

Head of Testing, Nortal AS
To her own great surprise, Helena Jeret-Mäe has become passionate about software testing after stumbling into it via technical writing. She has worked at testing medical practice management software, and has built and lead a testing team. | | She is currently Head of Testing at Nortal where she tries to figure out how to help testers do their best possible job. Helena loves to be part of the testing community because of the countless... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:15
17: Pjerrot

10:30

R02: From CDT Principles to Practice - a Model - CLOSED
It seems that when you present the seven principles of context-driven testing to anyone with some experience in IT, they agree with all seven of them. And yet not all of these people are context-driven. And even if you are context-driven, bridging the gap from principles to practice is hard. For instance, what are the practical implications of "Projects unfold over time in ways that are often not predictable."? After struggling with this myself, I managed to bridge this gap by creating my own model, my own way to express what context-driven testing is. This model consists of Tools, Process, Information, Value and People. While it does capture the philosophical underpinnings of context-driven testing, it connects these to what we see and do in our daily life as testers. A simple example is how the model distinguishes the tool 'document' from the information it may communicate during the process of reading. And while I wouldn't claim that my model magically solves the problem with the principles I described above, I do think it can be a valuable tool in moving from context-driven principle(s) to practice. Although the best way would probably be people creating their own models, like I have. Encouraging people to do so, is most definitely a secondary purpose of my talk.

Speakers
avatar for Joep Schuurkes (NL)

Joep Schuurkes (NL)

QA Engineer, Mendix
Armed with a degree in Philosophy Joep entered the testing profession in 2006. About two years later he discovered context-driven testing and knew he was where he needed to be. The first six years of his career he spent at a contracting firm called Qquest, where he tested in telecom and insurances. He also taught general and chain testing courses – enjoying that a great deal. That experience also helped him when presenting at TestNet and... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:15
18: Columbine

10:30

R03: Value Centered Dialogue in CDT - CLOSED
In this talk I will introduce the basic human values and demonstrate how dialogue revolving around these can play a powerful role in context driven testing leadership. Context is not a static 'thing'. To be context driven therefore implies responding to change. To me, helping people dealing with change in fruitful ways is fundamental in leadership. Values shape our actions and thereby shape us, and through dialogue we can explore our own and company values. As a context driven testing leader it is my ambiton to help people not only cope with change, but also to explore contexts in ways so they carry out valuable and efficient testing, and have fun while learning. I will introduce and explain the concept of protreptic dialogue, a value centered form of dialogue developed in ancient Greece and recently revived and reinvented by professor dr. phil. Ole Fogh Kirkeby at Copenhagen Business School. Leaders who practice protreptic dialogue use it to assist people accepting and dealing with change. I will demonstrate how protreptic dialogue can take place, discuss the actual outcomes of it and will share my own experiences using it in the workplace. I expect participants to be inspired to talking about human values with colleagues, bosses, teams and team members while exploriong contexts. I also expect some to want to learn more about protreptic dialogue.

Speakers
avatar for Anders Dinsen (DK)

Anders Dinsen (DK)

Tester, ASYM
I have 20 years of experience working as a test manager, project manager, technical test lead, software tester, software developer, team lead, and usability engineer. I have worked in the public sector as well as private sector industries finance, logistics, networking, and telecom. | | As a tester, I produce and communicate knowledge, and assess business and technical risks. As a test manager, I coach and lead people to unleash their... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:15
19: Harlekin

11:15

11:15

11:15

11:45

R04: A Community Discussion - CLOSED
What do you think of when you hear the phrase “context-driven testing community”? Our perception of the community is shaped by our experiences - the people that we choose to interact with and the ways that we choose to engage with them. Perhaps we see a close-knit support network or a friendly debate team, but others might hold a different perspective. There are testers who are fearful of joining our community. There are others who think that context-driven testing is simply about being against ISTQB or ISO29119. Some testers were once part of the community but have withdrawn due to their own poor experiences, or their interpretation of the experiences of others. Is this okay? But what would we lose by presenting a friendlier face? The community has been shaped by the idea that “no one is entitled to an unchallenged opinion”. Perhaps a culture of challenge and exclusivity is essential for deep conversation that leads to the development of excellence. Let’s talk about our community, what we value and how we can improve. Let’s consider how we interact with one another and communicate our key messages. Let’s leave this session with practical ideas about how we can each contribute to improving, explaining and marketing the context-driven testing community.

Speakers
avatar for Katrina Clokie (NZ)

Katrina Clokie (NZ)

Testing Coach, Bank of New Zealand
Katrina Clokie serves a team of more than 20 testers as a Testing Coach in Wellington, New Zealand. She is an active contributor to the international testing community as the editor of Testing Trapeze magazine, a mentor with Speak Easy, a co-founder of her local testing MeetUp WeTest Workshops, an international conference speaker, frequent blogger and tweeter.


Friday February 26, 2016 11:45 - 12:30
17: Pjerrot

11:45

R05: How I tested my own Game - CLOSED
We have all seen gamers who want to test games, and we have met testers that dream of working in a game project. So what to do if you're a professional tester, old-school gamer and doomed to work at “enterprise monsters” projects? My answer: Create your own game and test it however you want! Then questions came that I found myself wondering about. How to perform unit and integration testing in the context of a game project? How to use Test Driven Development? Could it become an efficient tool for your goals? Do you really need all of these "right things" in your project? In a small team with only 2 engineers, a 100 euros budget, and without professional graphic/sound artists? So how will this context affect trust in processes and test techniques that we are all happy to use when we work professionally and are being payed a good salary? That's only a brief list of questions that buzzed me each day and I'd like to tell the story of my struggle on the way to finding some answers for those questions. I will present answers for those questions through examples from my own project. This will be a personal experience report that I believe will be interesting for all testers that thought about working in a game project. My story also describes how I evaluated my tester's experience to use it in my own project. Lastly for me - this is a good motivation to structure the experience gained, get feedback, and to find new test challenges that I can tackle in my new project. And the final chord - we’ll have fun during a short bug hunt session of my game. Where everyone can evaluate the game we talked about so much. You shouldn’t miss that!

Speakers
avatar for Alexey Maksymenko (SE)

Alexey Maksymenko (SE)

Test Consultant, Northern Test Consulting
Alexey Maksymenko’s experience is broad within software development and testing. | | 10 years as Developer/Tester/Test Consultant. His hobby is game development. He originally came from Odessa, Ukraine. But he now lives and work based in Karlskrona in Sweden.


Friday February 26, 2016 11:45 - 12:30
18: Columbine

11:45

R06: Automation, the Good, the Bad and the Ugly - CLOSED
When I first heard of automation(in the context of continuous delivery) I though it is the holy grail of testing that will save me time and make testing better. Although the previous two statements are true, what I have learned over the last three and a half years is that it can be both good and bad, and sometimes ugly. I will show you what I have learned through doing it everyday(and sometimes in my sleep), what mistakes I’ve made and also what success looks like. Key points - automation will challenge you like no other but it will be fun and rewarding to overcome those challenges - automation done badly can do more harm then good - how to start automation on a project and where does that lead you

Speakers
avatar for Raluca Morariu (RO)

Raluca Morariu (RO)

Principal QA Engineer, Betfair
I’ve been in the software industry for 9 years now. Started as a developer back in 2006 and for the last three and a half years have been working as a tester. Currently I am a Principal QA Engineer with Betfair and I am an evangelist of continuous delivery and automation, having developed an in house framework to facilitate the development of automated tests and integrating them into continuous delivery.


Friday February 26, 2016 11:45 - 12:30
19: Harlekin

12:30

L02: Lunch at Tivoli Brasserie - CLOSED

Mingle and Lunch at "The Brasserie"


Friday February 26, 2016 12:30 - 13:30
19: Harlekin

12:30

L02: Lunch at Tivoli Brasserie - CLOSED
Mingle and Lunch at "The Brasserie"

Friday February 26, 2016 12:30 - 13:30
18: Columbine

12:30

L02: Lunch at Tivoli Brasserie - CLOSED

Mingle and Lunch at "The Brasserie"


Friday February 26, 2016 12:30 - 13:30
17: Pjerrot

13:30

R07: Antifragility at TeliaSonera Finland - CLOSED
"Antifragile" is a philosophy developed by world-renowned risk analyst and scholar Nassim Nicholas Taleb. According to it antifragile systems not only withstand volatility, randomness, disorder and stressors, but rather improve from them. One example used is the ancient Greek monster Hydra, who after losing a head grew two back. Many think that modern equivalents can be found from Agile, DevOps and Lean Startup approaches. In this presentation we dig into how antifragile models have been deployed into one of Finland's biggest companies. Everything revolves around "tribes" who make progress in their respective fields of interest. Mechanical front embraces e.g. automation, cloud solutions and process development while organic front focuses on e.g. people, building competence, exploration, continual learning and tribe dynamics. Ultimately the tribes form a cell structure that improves from change and for its part realizes the antifragile ideal. Come to see what has been achieved after one year of work, and discuss about the results.

Speakers
avatar for Sami Söderblom (FI)

Sami Söderblom (FI)

Head of Testing, TeliaSonera Finland
Sami is one of Finland’s leading experts in context-driven quality practices. He has over twelve years of history from a variety of testing and quality leadership positions in nearly twenty different business domains. He’s a colorful blogger, award winning author of many industry publications and a co-founder of Software Testing Finland, a local context-driven testing community. He regularly shares experiences from his domain of... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2016 13:30 - 14:15
17: Pjerrot

13:30

R08: Testing like Daredevil - CLOSED
Testing like daredevil: compensating for a lack of visual feedback When it comes to consuming music, entire experience sums up to which emotions get triggered in hearts and souls of the listeners. When we speak about professional testing of electronic music systems, how important are emotions awaken inside tester in this process? Can human senses (ears, eyes and touch) trick us or should we fully trust them? How to justify heuristics of desired software behaviour when inputs do not necessarily come from sight sensors most of humans depend in daily work? In this talk, focus will be streamed in following directions: 1. What makes testing (of even basic) electronic music production software and it’s related hardware ecosystems challenging 2. How to explore and learn about the system when visual decision heuristics are not always the most important (audible and tactile experience do matter even more) 3. Very often one hears testers in music industry speaking about “it feels right” or “it feels wrong”. How can we quantize and qualify “feeling” of certain flows and document our observations? 4. Mimicking various genres personas flow (hip-hop, minimal techno, dubstep, IDM/studio producers ...) as way of implementing charter based sessions. Audience will have chance to see short live performance on the very beginning of a talk, in order to feel what the system, talk is based on, “is all about”. Glorious take-aways of this thought provoking talk will be: Context and content do matter, critical thinking is the king! (Statement will be supported with real life examples from testing electronic music production software). How to deal with making decisions based on/in the lack of various human sensors streams of inputs How testing and creativity are happily married in domain of music software. What makes sense to automate in ecosystem of music production software

Speakers
avatar for Radomir Sebek (DE)

Radomir Sebek (DE)

Software and System Integration Tester, Natie Instruments
Radomir was born in Serbia and grow up in Montenegro. BSc from Electrotechnical University of Montenegro, major in electronics, telecommunication and computer science, among top of the class MSc from University of Tartu and Tallinn University of Technology, major in software engineering, among top of the class. | | Significant number of internships and student projects in various tech and social areas Software test engineer at Skype from... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2016 13:30 - 14:15
18: Columbine

13:30

R09: How I used 'My Mindset Toolkit' to Develop a Tester's Mindset - CLOSED
Quite a lot of testers miss out on the required mindset for testing. Sometimes it seems that quality consciousness is missing. Little wonder why some testers only find obvious bugs and why quality is far-fetched from the device under test (DUT) despite the presence of testers on the project. In this presentation I hope to present to you a set of tools that has helped me during my personal journey as a tester. These tools have helped me grow in my reasoning about the challenges I’m faced with on my daily task. My way of reasoning evolved into a set of tools that I refer to as “Mindset Tools”. While I reflected on my daily task and how to keep growing, I discovered that different task, required different lenses viewed at different angles with different mindsets hence to effectively test I need to tweak my mindset for different task. To achieve this, I need to keep my mindset flexible when I test. To keep my mindset flexible and help me look at things from different angles, I try to put a label on the mindset approaches that I find useful and I call it ”Mindset Toolkit” I will talk about how my "Mindset Toolkit" has helped me grow from a tester that finds obvious bugs to a tester that finds important bugs. I will give examples of different mindset tools and how I have used them to become a better tester. A few of these Mindset Tools are: User Mindset Tool, “Already Tested” Mindset Tool, Confidence Mindset Tool, Trust Mindset Tool, Courage Mindset Tool, Communicator Mindset Tool, Lazy Tester's Mindset Tool, Analytical Mindset Tool, Bug Finder Mindset Tool, Curiosity Mindset Tool, “Bug Conviction “Mindset Tool, “Business” Mindset Tool, “Dog Style” Mindset Tool, “Cat Style Mindset Tool.

Speakers
avatar for Vivien Ibironke Ibiyemi (SE)

Vivien Ibironke Ibiyemi (SE)

Software Tester, House of Test
My name is Vivien. Some folks call me by my native name: Ronke but I also like to describe myself as a terrific tester! I have coined this from my terrific love for testing and the aggressiveness with which I approach my test task. However I take the definition of terrific that is defined as “awesome” in description of my personality as a tester and that part of being terrifying (fear and awe) towards bugs and anything that degrades... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2016 13:30 - 14:15
19: Harlekin

14:15

14:15

14:15

14:45

R10: The Abyss - CLOSED
The last couple of years as a trainer I have been moving around in different contexts and what I have noticed is that test activities and testers are moving into two directions. This becomes especially visible between agile and non agile testers. The first are focussing a lot on automated testing, checks and tools. The second focuss more on validating requirements, content and manual testing. In this talk I want to address the abyss that apears to be forming between these two groups of testers, the differences, the commonalities and a way of bridging this abyss.

Speakers
avatar for Jean-Paul Varwijk (NL)

Jean-Paul Varwijk (NL)

Tester, Arborosa
Jean-Paul Varwijk is a tester, test manager and test thought leader at Rabobank. He has tested and has managed testing of a variety of products such as Apps, Data Warehouses, Credit Risk Models, Internet- and Mobile banking. | | He also is owner of Arborosa, a small one person Software Test Consultancy that specialises in providing workshops, tutorials and software test training. Outside of his daily work is a member of the Dutch Exploratory... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
17: Pjerrot

14:45

R11: The Red Button - CLOSED
In this talk, I will tell the story of the red button. This is a humorous, emotional and investigative story detailing a true experience that I had of a red button that was next to a mains socket on the wall behind the TV in a flat in Shanghai. It tore me to pieces trying to figure out what the button was for. But yet, my fiancee was not curious in the slightest about it. How could we both have such different curiosity levels? Is it because I am a tester? Or is it in my genes? I plan to share the emotions that I experienced and the lessons I learned from this experience. I'll also discuss the traits of a tester and I'll raise the question on whether curiosity and inquisitiveness is actually a gene that we possess. And I'll bring some compelling evidence to suggest why I believe that this may be the case through the DRD4 gene - a gene which apparently dictates our curiosity levels...

Speakers
avatar for Dan Ashby (UK)

Dan Ashby (UK)

Deputy Practice Head (Quality practice), Lab49
Hi! I’m Dan Ashby. | I am the Deputy Practice Head within the Quality Practice at Lab49. I’m currently living in London, but am originally from Glasgow. | | I’ve been testing for over a decade now, working on a wide variety of products as well as coaching and training people about testing and agile. | | I am passionate about utilizing Exploratory Testing and am currently focused on testing web-based FX Trading web apps... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
18: Columbine

14:45

R12: Recognizing Challenges Beyond Functional Testing - CLOSED
“After, you could check, I don’t know, localization, performance and usability. You know, the stuff you testers do…” This is an actual statement that was delivered to me by my very experienced software developer colleague. And it is a developer who gets that testing is something that is necessary for a successful project and he is doing his best to learn more about it so he can be better at understanding it. But what actually is a problem here is that we, as testers, are too often buried in functional testing. And besides that, functionality is not and should not be the only quality attribute of the software we should pay our attention to. So, is there a way to know how we can contribute to a project in order to deliver it in time with required level of quality? Are we aware of things that we might ask or do in order to make our (and everyone else’s) lives easier? If these questions are laid before most of the software testers they will most probably reference to an ISO/IEC 25010:2011 or another methodology or a standard in order to look for the software quality attributes. Problem with those is that they are too elaborate, detailed to remember it easily and questionable in many ways. This presentation is the result of a search for a model that will enable a software tester to properly define context of the software under test and compose such questions, which will result in a list of tasks that should be performed in order to deliver a successful product.

Speakers
avatar for Uros Stanisic (RS)

Uros Stanisic (RS)

Test Manager, Execom
My name is Uros and I’m a software tester. I’ve been testing, leading, managing and coaching for 9 years so far. I’ve started with knowing nothing about testing and not having anyone to ask. Having that in mind I worked hard on gaining knowledge and experience which later lead to establishing a testing organization within our company. We, early testers, have proven how valuable we can be and that development is not the sole... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2016 14:45 - 15:30
19: Harlekin

15:30

15:30

15:30

16:00

K02: Value Sync - CLOSED

Robert explained that he had always been sub-consciously aware of the principles of being on-purpose within any project effort but the importance of performing value sync came during the late 1980’s when he’d inherited a project in crisis about part way through its planned duration. The project was critical for the organization and its shareholders, and he was assigned to manage the quality assurance team at that time. He found that the testers on the QA team were especially depressed and struggling with the demands of the development team. Upon close examination Robert noted that the ideas for success within the project effort were different for various members of the project team. There was a lot of pressure to hit some sort of release date and they also felt that the software was nowhere near ready for use.

“I see that as being revealing because actually, the ideas in the heads of all the different players were very different and they were really working towards dramatically different purposes and on dramatically different schedules of value”.

Indeed, the intent of the project effort was to demonstrate to shareholders that their capital investment could be turned into new, revenue generating technologies. Neither the testing team nor the developers involved had any knowledge of this purpose and thus the necessity for realigning values was obvious. The realignment involved all members of the team and its extended stakeholders; testers, developers, project management, sales, finance, and board level were involved. The effort of synchronizing values throughout those involved brought many members of the team back from a point close to quitting. Furthermore, by establishing a stronger understanding by all for the shared value each has in the project, the value sync spurred a heroic effort that brought the test team to the highest levels of recognition by the shareholders of the company. The QA team was applauded for ensuring the success of the project and the $2.3 million it generated in new equity.

This was and is ‘value sync’, an effort to align people’s expectations for the effort in hand. As Robert explains, Once I knew what they really cared about, once they knew what we really cared about, and we were in sync about these things then we found fantastic solutions to problems which we’d never have dreamt of if we had just tried to solve them using tactical testing techniques.

In his keynote at CopenhagenContext 2016, Robert will detail three different types of values and how those values may be revealed. He lists these as emphatic values, dynamic values and emergent values.


Speakers
avatar for Rob Sabourin (CA)

Rob Sabourin (CA)

Software Engineer, Teacher and Consultant, AmiBug
Rob Sabourin, P. Eng., has more than thirty-two years of management experience leading teams of software development professionals. A well-respected member of the software engineering community, Rob has managed, trained, mentored, and coached hundreds of top professionals in the field. He frequently speaks at conferences and writes on software engineering, SQA, testing, management, and internationalization. Rob wrote I am a Bug!, the popular... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
19: Harlekin

16:00

K02: Value Sync - CLOSED

Robert explained that he had always been sub-consciously aware of the principles of being on-purpose within any project effort but the importance of performing value sync came during the late 1980’s when he’d inherited a project in crisis about part way through its planned duration. The project was critical for the organization and its shareholders, and he was assigned to manage the quality assurance team at that time. He found that the testers on the QA team were especially depressed and struggling with the demands of the development team. Upon close examination Robert noted that the ideas for success within the project effort were different for various members of the project team. There was a lot of pressure to hit some sort of release date and they also felt that the software was nowhere near ready for use.

“I see that as being revealing because actually, the ideas in the heads of all the different players were very different and they were really working towards dramatically different purposes and on dramatically different schedules of value”.

Indeed, the intent of the project effort was to demonstrate to shareholders that their capital investment could be turned into new, revenue generating technologies. Neither the testing team nor the developers involved had any knowledge of this purpose and thus the necessity for realigning values was obvious. The realignment involved all members of the team and its extended stakeholders; testers, developers, project management, sales, finance, and board level were involved. The effort of synchronizing values throughout those involved brought many members of the team back from a point close to quitting. Furthermore, by establishing a stronger understanding by all for the shared value each has in the project, the value sync spurred a heroic effort that brought the test team to the highest levels of recognition by the shareholders of the company. The QA team was applauded for ensuring the success of the project and the $2.3 million it generated in new equity.

This was and is ‘value sync’, an effort to align people’s expectations for the effort in hand. As Robert explains, Once I knew what they really cared about, once they knew what we really cared about, and we were in sync about these things then we found fantastic solutions to problems which we’d never have dreamt of if we had just tried to solve them using tactical testing techniques.

In his keynote at CopenhagenContext 2016, Robert will detail three different types of values and how those values may be revealed. He lists these as emphatic values, dynamic values and emergent values.


Speakers
avatar for Rob Sabourin (CA)

Rob Sabourin (CA)

Software Engineer, Teacher and Consultant, AmiBug
Rob Sabourin, P. Eng., has more than thirty-two years of management experience leading teams of software development professionals. A well-respected member of the software engineering community, Rob has managed, trained, mentored, and coached hundreds of top professionals in the field. He frequently speaks at conferences and writes on software engineering, SQA, testing, management, and internationalization. Rob wrote I am a Bug!, the popular... Read More →


Friday February 26, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
18: Columbine

17:00

C02: Closing - CLOSED
CopenhagenContext 2016 Chair Ilari Henrik Aegerter, sums up and closes the 3rd CopenhagenContext Conference and introduces to the:
- Chair
- Theme
- Dates
- Venue

...of the upcoming CopenhagenContext 2017.

Program Committee
avatar for Chair - Ilari Henrik Aegerter (CH)

Chair - Ilari Henrik Aegerter (CH)

Managing Director, House of Test GmbH
My formal studies have brought me from General Linguistics and Sociology to Software Engineering and Software Testing. I so much liked the profession that I continued to intensively work on my skills. Being a context-driven tester is the natural outcome and I believe that software testing is not a clerical job but a profession, which needs a high level of proficiency. | | I have 10+ years of experience in the field, coming from the medical... Read More →

Friday February 26, 2016 17:00 - 17:15
18: Columbine

17:00

C02: Closing - CLOSED
CopenhagenContext 2016 Chair Ilari Henrik Aegerter, sums up and closes the 3rd CopenhagenContext Conference and introduces to the:
- Chair
- Theme
- Dates
- Venue

...of the upcoming CopenhagenContext 2017.

Program Committee
avatar for Chair - Ilari Henrik Aegerter (CH)

Chair - Ilari Henrik Aegerter (CH)

Managing Director, House of Test GmbH
My formal studies have brought me from General Linguistics and Sociology to Software Engineering and Software Testing. I so much liked the profession that I continued to intensively work on my skills. Being a context-driven tester is the natural outcome and I believe that software testing is not a clerical job but a profession, which needs a high level of proficiency. | | I have 10+ years of experience in the field, coming from the medical... Read More →

Friday February 26, 2016 17:00 - 17:15
19: Harlekin
 

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